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Archive for October, 2015

Michael F. Toomey. Photo by John Dolan

A Singer’s Notes 118: Death, the Imperative — An Iliad at Shakespeare and Company

Why must we kill? Why pay people large sums of money to hurt each other in the ring? And what about the flip side? After great Hector is killed and dragged for days around the city, he is restored physically by a deity, but remains dead. From this there comes serenity, expectancy we experience only those few times in our lives when our heroes die.

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Retrato del maestro Carlos Chávez, oil on canvas, 1948

Bard Music Festival 2015: Carlos Chávez and his World, Weekend I

As the Bard Music Festival has sailed through the great names in European and American music over the past twenty-five years—although there are some people who don’t like Elgar, Liszt, or Wagner, and some who doubt Saint-Saëns’ or Sibelius’ importance (if they attended the Festival they left with their minds changed)—the focal points of the festival have been generally unchallenged. This year, with Carlos Chávez, the first composer from south of the border, there has been more debate. Many attendees—and especially non-attendees—questioned the worthiness of Carlos Chávez as a subject. He is largely forgotten, and many of those who do remember him, do not think of him kindly. Even Leon Botstein himself expressed a critical attitude towards Chávez,






Carlos Chavez by Manuel Álvarez Bravo. ca. 1930-40, © Colette Urbajtel/Archivo Manuel Álvarez Bravo, SC

The Bard Music Festival 2015: Carlos Chávez and His World, a Preview

This is the first Bard Music Festival, Carlos Chávez and his World, to be devoted to music from south of the border. Up here, Central and South Americans were much more prominent in the classical music world in Chávez’s time (1899-1978) than they are in the present. Today most concert-goers see this music through the window of Gustavo Dudamel and all his good works, and El Sistéma from which he emerged, is all the rage among music educators, possibly destined to become something like a Suzuki method of the twenty-first century.






David Hansen, Amanda Forsythe, and Nell Snaidas in Boston Early Music Festival’s production of Monteverdi’€™s ”L€’incoronazione di Poppea.” Photo Frank Siteman.

A Singer’s Notes 117: A Lion in Winter at Oldcastle, Tom Sawyer at Dorset, and BEMF’s Monteverdi Trilogy Online

Another outing for this rambling, aging play, this time a good one, expertly cast. The play itself leaves little to the imagination, the acting is all. Nigel Gore’s King Henry was a real tour-de-force. Unflagging energy, powerful and detailed at the same time, one of the best things I have seen him do. Let me say,at the outset,that I admire the whole troupe. They had done this over the top play in the afternoon, came back a few hours later, and gave it all they had. Christine Dekker made the role of Queen Eleanor her own. She gave a super detailed performance that only now and then turned sharp.