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Early Music and Baroque

Aston Magna is Back! Bach Father & Son, & Their Peers: J.S. & C.P.E Bach, Handel, Buxtehude

St. James Place, Great Barrington
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St. James Place, Great Barrington
St. James Place, Great Barrington

Bach Father & Son, & Their Peers:
J.S. & C.P.E Bach, Handel, Buxtehude

Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 @ 7 p.m.
Saint James Place
352 Main Street, Great Barrington
Pre-concert talk at 6 p.m. with
Artistic Director Dan Stepner

Daniel Stepner, baroque violin
Laura Jeppesen, viola da gamba
Peter Sykes, harpsichord
Andrea LeBlanc, baroque flute

PROGRAM

Dietrich Buxtehude
Sonata a due in B Flat, for violin, gamba and continuo

Georg Friderich Handel
Sonata in B Minor, for flute and continuo

C.P.E. Bach
Sonata in C Minor, for keyboard and violin

Intermission

 Johann Sebastian Bach
A Musical Offering (selections)
Three-part Ricercare
5 canons
Trio Sonata

The announcement of this concert at St. James Place came as a very pleasant surprise. There’s no need to wait until June to hear an Aston Magna Concert! And that is certainly a event much-anticipated among early music lovers and Berkshire residents. Aston Magna regulars, Daniel Stepner, baroque violin, Laura Jeppesen, viola da gamba, Peter Sykes, harpsichord, and Andrea LeBlanc, baroque flute, will play excerpts from a central work by J. S. Bach, A Musical Offering, covering the basic styles of composition contained within it: canons, a fugue (ricercare), and a trio sonata, as well as sonatas—respectively for viola da gamba and violin, flute, and violin—by Buxtehude, Handel, and C. P. E. Bach. The selection from the Offering is especially sympathetic to the other works on the program, with the simpler ricercare (the one Bach was able to improvise on the spot, when Frederick the Great presented him with his theme and the challenge to write a fugue on it) and the Trio Sonata.

Music doesn’t get any better than this, and neither do the executants!

About Michael Miller

Michael Miller, Editor and Publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review, an International Journal for the Arts, was trained as a classicist and art historian at Harvard and Oxford, worked in the art world for many years as a curator and dealer, and contributed reviews and articles to Bostonia, Master Drawings, Drawing, Threshold, and North American Opera Journal, as well as numerous articles for scholarly and popular periodicals. He has taught courses in classics, the English language, and art history at Oberlin, Rutgers, New York University, the New School, and Williams. Currently, when he is not at work on The Berkshire Review and New York Arts, he writes fiction, pursues photography, and publishes scholarly work. In 2011 he contributed an introductory essay to Leonard Freed: The Italians / exh. cat. Io Amo L’Italia, exhibition at Le Stelline, Milan, Il Museo di Roma a Trastevere, etc. and wrote the revised the section on American opera houses in The Grove Dictionary of American Music. He is currently at work on a libretto for a new opera by Lewis Spratlan, Midi, an adaptation of Euripides’ Medea set in the French West Indies, ca. 1930.

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