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A Singer’s Notes 72: Boston Early Music Festival’s Almira at the Mahaiwe

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Amanda Forsythe as Edilia in the Boston Early Music Festival's production of Handel's Almira. Photo by Kathy Wittman.Amanda Forsythe as Edilia in the Boston Early Music Festival's production of Handel's Almira. Photo by Kathy Wittman.

Amanda Forsythe as Edilia in the Boston Early Music Festival’s production of Handel’s Almira. Photo by Kathy Wittman.

Once again the Boston Early Music Festival has shown us that elegance and energy are not mutually exclusive. As always in their performances, the superb orchestra is a leading player. At BEMF one never gets the sense that there is a divide between stage and pit. In fact, there is no pit. The players sit on the orchestra level, fully visible and physically expressive. The best exemplar of this process is leader Robert Mealy himself, who manages to seem at once gentle and passionate. I cannot say that Handel’s Almira was my favorite opera seen in the Mahaiwe, but it is a Handelian youthful adventure, and not yet quite full of sap. It is an age-old story, that of getting the right boy with the right girl. The business of the opera is a courtship process. The process must be interesting over three substantial acts for the show to work, and despite the excellent efforts of the cast, it wasn’t all the time. Through the many twists and turns, one did not sense through-going character definition. By way of comparison, one thinks of the great role of Cleopatra in Giulio Cesare, whose several arias pile one glory upon another and leave us with a complete, nearly Shakespearean, definition of her character. There were valiant attempts to keep Almira lively. Ulrike Hofbauer in the title role used her sizable and beautiful voice tellingly — especially the top of it — to carry us through the many ups and downs of her plight. Her sound was affecting and commanding by turns. She had a stillness which compelled you to stay with her. Colin Balzer, tenor, one of my favorite singers, has a voice of great sweetness, and his identification with the words he sings is complete. His role of Fernando, a kind of one-note Johnny, was filled out admirably even though he had to express the same sentiment repeatedly. Amanda Forsythe as Edilia used her quick-silver but warm voice to give vibrant life to the spitfire princess. I especially admired the sweetness of Tyler Duncan’s singing as Raymondo.

The continuo group, Paul O’Dette, Stephen Stubbs, Maxine Eilander, and David Morris, were wonderfully specific. They competed (and sometimes won) the battle between the stage and the pit. The staging was, as always, elegant and often powerful. All of this contributed mightily to a splendid evening, but could not rescue entirely the stock characterization too often heard. We must thank the Boston Early Music Festival and other fine historical performing organizations for making us familiar with Handel’s greatest dramas, far more familiar than we were even ten years ago. It was also valuable to see and hear the roots of his dramaturgy in Almira.

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