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Berkshire Review’s International “Portals”

As The Berkshire Review has grown, we have developed certain international centers, where our writers either live or often return. Our coverage in these locations will continue to grow and become more comprehensive with time, and others will be added to them. But these are not all, you will find reports from Chicago, Madison, Wisconsin, Virginia, Turkey, and Poland. If you are travelling or looking for a place to settle, you will find this list of our local “portals” helpful.

About Michael Miller

Michael Miller, Editor and Publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review, an International Journal for the Arts, was trained as a classicist and art historian at Harvard and Oxford, worked in the art world for many years as a curator and dealer, and contributed reviews and articles to Bostonia, Master Drawings, Drawing, Threshold, and North American Opera Journal, as well as numerous articles for scholarly and popular periodicals. He has taught courses in classics, the English language, and art history at Oberlin, Rutgers, New York University, the New School, and Williams. Currently, when he is not at work on The Berkshire Review and New York Arts, he writes fiction, pursues photography, and publishes scholarly work. In 2011 he contributed an introductory essay to Leonard Freed: The Italians / exh. cat. Io Amo L’Italia, exhibition at Le Stelline, Milan, Il Museo di Roma a Trastevere, etc. and wrote the revised the section on American opera houses in The Grove Dictionary of American Music. He is currently at work on a libretto for a new opera by Lewis Spratlan, Midi, an adaptation of Euripides’ Medea set in the French West Indies, ca. 1930.

“What Inspires Design in Istanbul?” with Superpool: Becoming Istanbul at SALT Beyoğlu

On September 13, 2011, Gregers Tang Thomsen and Selva Gürdoğan, of Superpool, in collaboration with Project and Projects, lead a talk at SALT Beyoğlu entitled “What Inspires Design in Istanbul.” The discussion revolved around the innovative project, Becoming Istanbul, which will run from September 13, 2011 to December 31, 2011.

During this three month event, ”two parallel programs [will commence], 90, a program of 90 events focusing on contemporary issues in Istanbul, and The Making Of Beyoğlu, a series of workshops examining the methodology and implementation of projects initiated in the city’s center.” At “What Inspires Design in Istanbul,” Superpool explored the obvious and subtle design opportunities of the Becoming Istanbul installation.

Renée van Staveren

About Renée van Staveren

Renée van Staveren is the Founder of Global Site Plans. She holds a M.S. in Urban and Regional Planning from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She also holds a B.S. in Sustainable Community Development from Prescott College. Renée currently lives in Istanbul, Turkey; adding to the list of places she has traveled and lived. Follow her on Twitter @globalsiteplans.

Boston Early Music Festival 2011 – II: Success or Excess?

The number, variety, and quality range of the BEMF musical events is so vast that it induces a kind of giddiness or vertigo over the course of the week that can be taken as either the frenzy of enthusiasm or the disorientation of overload. This is not necessarily a bad thing. Going to concerts is always a social event, and attending a series of them along with numbers of articulate, knowledgeable people (including the total stranger who might be wearing an “Earlier than Thou” T-shirt) with whom you can share information and compare responses is stimulating—at the very worst—at best highly enlightening.

About Laurence Wallach

Larry Wallach is a pianist, musicologist, and composer who lives in Great Barrington, Massachusetts and heads the Music Program at Simon’s Rock College of Bard. He has also taught composition at Bard College. He studied piano privately with Henry Danielowitz and Kenneth Cooper, and was trained at Columbia University where he studied music history with Paul Henry Lang, performance practices with Denis Stevens, and composition with Otto Luening, Jack Beeson, and Charles Wuorinen. He earned a doctorate in musicology in 1973 with a dissertation about Charles Ives. In 1977, he was awarded a grant to become part of a year-long National Endowment for the Humanities seminar at the University of North Carolina directed by William S. Newman, focussing on performance practices in earlier piano music. He went on to participate in the Aston Magna Summer Academy in 1980, where he studied fortepiano with Malcolm Bilson, both privately and in master classes.

Larry Wallach has been an active performer of chamber music with harpsichord and piano, and of twentieth century music. He has collaborated with harpsichordist Kenneth Cooper, with recorder virtuoso Bernard Krainis, with violinist Nancy Bracken of the Boston Symphony, with violinist/violist Ronald Gorevic, with gambist Lucy Bardo, and with his wife, cellist Anne Legêne, performing on both modern and baroque instruments. He has appeared with the Avanti Quintet, the New York Consort of Viols, and is a regular performer on the “Octoberzest” series in Great Barrington. He has been on the staffs of summer early music workshops at World Fellowship and Pinewoods Camp.
In 1996, he presented a program at the Bard Music Festival devoted to Charles Ives designed around a performance the composer’s Second Violin Sonata along with all the source tunes that are quoted in it. Part of this program was repeated at Lincoln Center in NY. He has also appeared on programs in Washington DC, and at St. Croix VI. As a composer, his works have been heard in New York, Boston, Amherst, the Berkshires, and at Bard College.

Another Angle on Wagner’s Lohengrin in Chicago

The Chicago Lyric Opera’s Lohengrin is a testament to the major problem of many American opera productions today. On the one hand, conductor Sir Andrew Davis’ formidable interpretation rivalled the greatest in Wagnerian history, but on the other hand, director Elijah Moshinsky’s lackluster staging rivalled your average high-school production. The irony of hearing some of the world’s greatest Wagnerian voices while seeing some of its most awkward blocking is nothing new to regular attendees of the American Wagner scene. That said, the Lyric might have done well to present the evening in concert form.

Amy Stebbins

About Amy Stebbins

Amy Stebbins graduated from Harvard University in 2007 with an B.A. in History and Literature. Her Honors thesis examined the ideological and structural underpinnings of Brecht’s Berliner Ensemble as a model for The National Theatre in London (1962-1973). Amy moved to Berlin in 2007 as a Fulbright Scholar, during which time she worked with René Pollesch, Sebastian Baumgarten, Stefan Pucher, Chris Kondek and Frank Castorf at the Volksbühne and Maxim Gorki Theater. Her subsequent work as a director, producer, dramaturge, video-artist and performer took her to Berlin, Brussels, New York, Paris, Boston and London. Amy’s academic work deals in part with practical intersections of music, performance and film; she is also fascinated by the dynamic relationship between art and politics.

Commentary: Here and There… of Anthropology at Home and Abroad

The ethnographic films of Robert Gardner and anthropology in general resonate quite powerfully with me, although I’ve hardly ever had a chance to become broadly or deeply acquainted with either. My first encounter with Gardner’s Dead Birds, his best-known work, made a deep impression on me, not only because of the film itself, which was reason enough, but because of the odd circumstances in which I first discovered it.

About Michael Miller

Michael Miller, Editor and Publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review, an International Journal for the Arts, was trained as a classicist and art historian at Harvard and Oxford, worked in the art world for many years as a curator and dealer, and contributed reviews and articles to Bostonia, Master Drawings, Drawing, Threshold, and North American Opera Journal, as well as numerous articles for scholarly and popular periodicals. He has taught courses in classics, the English language, and art history at Oberlin, Rutgers, New York University, the New School, and Williams. Currently, when he is not at work on The Berkshire Review and New York Arts, he writes fiction, pursues photography, and publishes scholarly work. In 2011 he contributed an introductory essay to Leonard Freed: The Italians / exh. cat. Io Amo L’Italia, exhibition at Le Stelline, Milan, and wrote the revised the section on American opera houses in The Grove Dictionary of American Music. He is currently at work on a libretto for a new opera by Lewis Spratlan, Midi, an adaptation of Euripides’ Medea set in the French West Indies, ca. 1930.

Some True Things Arranged Deceptively – a Screenplay

A jumbo jet full of PASSENGERS waits to pass through customs, passports in hand. They are in between, not yet present in any country. At the end of the corridor an automated dispenser of hand sanitizer welcomes them to the United States and to Los Angeles, such as it is. A few passengers exchange anxious glances with the impassive and, for some, unfamiliar machine.

The line does not move.

Eventually a DIMINUTIVE WOMAN approaches the machine, hand extended. The dispenser BUZZES and a tennis ball-sized dollop of hand sanitizer appears in her hand. She returns to her place in line, staring at the impassive white bolus in her palm, more anxious than before.

The line begins to move.

Alan Miller

About Alan Miller

Alan Miller is a graduate of the Sydney University Faculty of Architecture and holds a BFA in film from the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. A fanatical cyclist, he is a former Sydney Singlespeed Champion. Alan Miller reports on cycling, film, architecture, politics, and other sports in his letters from Sydney. He won the 2011 Architects’ Journal Writing Prize.

Acis as Genius of Cannons

In the summer of 1717, after the highly successful performance of his Water Music for the King of England, Handel left busy London and went to take up residence at rural Cannons, a few miles from the English capital. The composer, temporarily unable to have his operas produced, was answering the invitation of one of his patrons: James Brydges, the Earl of Carnarvon, who would in 1719 be elevated to the title by which he is best known: the Duke of Chandos.

My Odessa: a Photo Essay

My current exhibition at Papyri Books in North Adams is the fruit of a totally unexpected, but absolutely wonderful trip I was lucky to take last June to Odessa, the legendary city-port on the shore of the Black Sea. I was invited by a friend who was there on a contract to spend a week in Odessa together with his family.

Joanna Gabler

About Joanna Gabler

My adventures in photography started in the early 1990’s, when I discovered the annual New York Orchid Show. Not a total novice with my Nikon FM2, I became absorbed in macrophotography and discovering inner and intimate dimensions of the flowers I had never dreamed of before, hidden from the naked eye, to be found only through the lens of camera. This journey blossomed over twenty years into ongoing series of flower portraits in oil and initiated a lasting passion for nature photography with the intention of discovering through the lens of a camera that which is hidden from direct physical vision. In 2001 I started working with a digital camera.
The next big step happened in the spring of 2008, when I was inspired to expand my artistic vision by combining my love for photography and painting nature into one artistic expression, with the mission of capturing the unseen energies behind physical reality. This was made possible through the advance of digital technology.

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