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A Singer’s Notes by Keith Kibler rss

Paul Romeo and Nathan Stith in Oldcastle Theatre Company's production of " Moonlight and Magnolias,

A Singer’s Notes 135: Moonlight and Magnolias at Oldcastle Theatre and the Chiara String Quartet at Mohawk Trail Concerts(0)

July 20, 2017

In a play that basically pursues one action only, that of completing a script for the film of Gone With the Wind, four excellent actors kept us laughing. There was certainly excess in virtually every aspect of the performance, but it was funny excess.

Amanda Forsythe, Douglas Williams, and Carlos Fittante in Pergolesi's La Serva Padrona. Photo Kathy Wittman.

A Singer’s Notes 134: BEMF intertwines two Pergolesi farces and sublime singing from Dominique Labelle at Aston Magna.

This performance was a frolic. It displayed a combination of two quite different buffo operas, and yes, it worked. Pergolesi’s La Serva Padrona and Livietta e Tracollo combined, found a zany success. I had my doubts at first, but was laughing my head off soon enough. The better-known of the two, La Serva Padrona, revolves around the character Uberto, a pomposo, energetically sung by Douglas Williams. Sad Tracollo was sung winningly by Jesse Blumberg.






A Singer’s Notes 133: The Bookclub Play and Shakespeare’s Cymbeline, coming up at Shakespeare and Company

The Bookclub Play Karen Zacarias’s The Bookclub Play at Hubbard Hall was rather like a sporting event. There were jabs and plenty of taunting throughout the farce. Like most comedies on the edge of farce, the play moved in circles, many repetitions, the clock rolling around full circle. There was some very fine acting. Oliver […]

Fr. Schwoerer illustration of Act 4, Scene 1 (Petruchio rejects the bridal dinner). Engraved by Georg Goldberg (c.1850).

A Singer’s Notes 132: Lovers’ Spat at Shakespeare & Company; Padmore & Biss at Union College

Shakespeare and Company’s latest offering, “Lovers’ Spat: Shakespeare’s Famous Couples’ Encounters” was a frolic; gags and ad-libs abounded. It had an Elizabethan tinge. Actors were on-book and off-book; everybody was having a wonderful time. It has long been a positive aspect of the Company not to take everything so seriously. We remember that Shakespeare’s plays were new plays, experimental plays, which doubtless took a different path every performance.







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