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A Singer’s Notes by Keith Kibler rss

Peter and the Starcatcher at Hubbard Hall, Full Cast. Photo Peter Sutton.

A Singer’s Notes 130: Peter and the Starcatcher at Hubbard Hall(Comments Off on A Singer’s Notes 130: Peter and the Starcatcher at Hubbard Hall)

November 19, 2016

Soooo, we are riding through a dark night, much too dark for late fall, to beautiful Hubbard Hall in Cambridge, New York. It looks warm, it smells warm, it is warm. When we got there, took our seats, we saw what very well may be the most intricate piece of theater ever played on this stage. I’m talking about Peter and the Starcatcher, a prequel to Peter Pan,

Singer’s Notes 129: The Consul, the Tramp, and America’s Sweetheart at Oldcastle; Hamlet at Shakespeare & Co.; Kožená at Union College

Yet another success for this Company. There was vivid acting. Elizabeth Aspenlieder, as Mary Pickford, is an arresting actress, her voice resonant, her intentions clear. Ms. Aspenlieder enlivens every role she takes. She makes the character happen. There was an exceptional performance from David Joseph in the role of Charlie Chaplin. His work on the role, particularly the physical aspect of the character had a completeness which he imagined carefully and made his own.






Alexina Jones

A Singer’s Notes 128: Alexina Jones leaves Hubbard Hall Opera Theatre; Two Gentlemen and Henry VI at Shakespeare and Company

A singular departure this year at summer’s end. Hubbard Hall Opera Theatre (of Cambridge, New York), the dream-child of Alexina Jones, has lost its creator and mentor. She goes on to a position with Saratoga Arts. This young women is an intrepid creator. She built a company from nothing, fit it into the seasonal circumstances of Hubbard Hall, and with the help of her husband, Jason Dolmetsch, plodded through hundreds of hours of planning, auditioning, fund-raising. The Company started out in a modest way—a few instruments, mostly local singers. One of the first of these singers, Kara Cornell, turned in a Carmen that was utterly believable. Watching an opera of this sort in a small hall requires detailed specific acting; the grand gestures seem absurd.






TMC Vocal Fellow Fleur Barron and Dominik Belavy perform in Kurt Weill's Seven Deadly Sins in Ozawa Hall. Photo Hilary Scott.

A Singer’s Notes 127: Great Things at the TMC, and Good Fun at the Berkshire Theatre Festival and Shakespeare and Company

In line with the excellent work I have heard at Tanglewood, was the Fellows’ vocal concert. Kurt Weill’s The Seven Deadly Sins was masterfully led by mezzo-soprano Fleur Barron, Nuno Coelho, conductor, with Nicholas Muni as director. Mr. Muni’s direction was not fussy, and it tapped into the knife-edged nature of the show without excess. Ms. Barron gave a masterful performance. Not only was her voice beguiling in every way, she moved decisively, and somehow naturally, through the opera. Each of her skills contributed to a larger convincing performance in this ice-cold piece.







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