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Tag: Centre Georges Pompidou

The Consul, the Tramp, and America’s Sweetheart, by John Morogiello, at the Oldcastle Theatre Company, Bennington

The Oldcastle Theatre Company is one of the most appealing in the Berkshires, which, culturally, extends from northwestern Connecticut to Dorset and Weston, Vermont. Downtown Bennington has a unique feeling to it—small-town in the best sense—and is home to a respectable array of bars and restaurants for audiences to enjoy anticipation or a cool-down before or after the show. Keith Kibler has been chronicling and enjoying—very much—Oldcastle’s productions for some years on our site, and I was happy finally to catch a show myself.

About Michael Miller

Michael Miller, Editor and Publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review, an International Journal for the Arts, was trained as a classicist and art historian at Harvard and Oxford, worked in the art world for many years as a curator and dealer, and contributed reviews and articles to Bostonia, Master Drawings, Drawing, Threshold, and North American Opera Journal, as well as numerous articles for scholarly and popular periodicals. He has taught courses in classics, the English language, and art history at Oberlin, Rutgers, New York University, the New School, and Williams. Currently, when he is not at work on The Berkshire Review and New York Arts, he writes fiction, pursues photography, and publishes scholarly work. In 2011 he contributed an introductory essay to Leonard Freed: The Italians / exh. cat. Io Amo L’Italia, exhibition at Le Stelline, Milan, and wrote the revised the section on American opera houses in The Grove Dictionary of American Music. He is currently at work on a libretto for a new opera by Lewis Spratlan, Midi, an adaptation of Euripides’ Medea set in the French West Indies, ca. 1930.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Madonna and Child with St. Anne. Musée du Louvre, Paris. Art

La Nuit des Musées, Paris

Each year, there is a cultural event in Europe, La Nuit des Musées, when for one Saturday night in mid-May participating museums throughout Europe are open free and late.

If you are in Europe in May it is an event definitely worth investigating, if not for the opportunity to enter museums free of charge then for the sheer experience of some of the world’s most famous museums after hours, surrounded by more locals than tourists. Another plus is that as part of the event, many of the museums have special events, such as concerts and guided tours. Attending, however, requires special planning. Paris, the city where I was located during their La Nuit des Musées, had 45 participating venues with 179 events. I utilized roughly the entire time span of the event, 6pm – 1am, and managed four venues.

About Erin C. Devine

Erin Devine received her Ph.D. in Modern Art, with a focus on art since 1980, from Indiana University. Her dissertation, From Translation to Transgression: The Feminism(s) of Shirin Neshat, offers a more nuanced understanding of Neshat’s work, exploring the history of veiling in Iran, Orientalist imagery, and the misunderstandings and misrepresentations of veiled women in the U.S. Devine’s methodology includes critical writings on gender in Islam and an Islamist society, a socio-political history of Iran in the twentieth century, and postcolonial understandings of transnational feminism and the exilic/diasporic subject, all important to fully articulating new interpretations of Neshat that refute accusations of exoticization. Since completion of her Ph.D. in 2011, Devine has been appointed as an Assistant Professor of Art History at Longwood University in south central Virginia, where she is working on a manuscript based on her dissertation. Returning to work as a practicing artist in performance and video, Devine recently studied under Jonathan Harris at Anderson Ranch in Colorado and will be an Artist in Residence this summer at Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris.

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