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Aston Magna Music Festival 2017 – A Preview(Comments Off on Aston Magna Music Festival 2017 – A Preview)

June 11, 2017

The Aston Magna season, the 45th(!), is almost upon us. We can look forward to an extended schedule, adding fifth and sixth weekends at the Brandeis and Great Barrington venues, which is no longer on the Simon’s Rock campus, but at the recently renovated Saint James Place.

Students at École de Musique Sainte Trinité, from Owsley Brown's Serenade for Haiti

Serenade for Haiti, Directed and Written by Owsley Brown, at the Berkshire International Film Festival, June 3

Among the rich offerings of the 2017 Berkshire International Film Festival, one of the most fascinating and important films will be Owsley Brown’s documentary, Serenade for Haiti. The film could be described as an extended visit to the École de Musique Sainte Trinité in Pétionville, a suburb of Port-au-Prince. Mr. Brown, who had made other films about music and its role in human society and spirituality, first visited the school in 2006, and was, as he has said, “greatly affected by what [he] found there.”






An explosion of music in the Berkshires: Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now and Arthur Greene, Pianist, at Simon’s Rock; Ensemble Nieuw Nederland at the Roe-Jan Library, Hillsdale, NY

This coming weekend there will be an explosion of music in the Berkshires! and I can strongly recommend three concerts taking place on Friday evening, Saturday afternoon, and Sunday afternoon. They are all free, but there is a suggested $10. donation for Saturday afternoon. Read on…






Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater

Shakespeare and Company Benefit: Hamish Linklater and Lily Rabe in Richard III.  October 10th at 2:00.  Be there!

Is Shakespeare loquacious? Reading the last pages of Richard III one might think so. King Richard speaks his way into oblivion.
He seems to be made of words—his actions secondary, the description being all. This, after all, is a character who succeeds in wooing a widow over the coffin of a close relative, and after the deed, tells us about it as if we didn’t get it the first time. His comeuppance arrives eventually, and true to form, he is ready with a virtuoso description of the situation. He is always and everywhere a soliloquist. Richard’s words are a virtuosity. Hamlet’s words are long-considered, pondered. Richard finds his demise at least as theatrical as his life, and when the end comes, Marlovian rant rules. Needless to say, this requires spectacular acting.







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