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The Bard Music Festival and SummerScape Opera 2016: Puccini and his World, with Pietro Mascagni’s Iris(Comments Off on The Bard Music Festival and SummerScape Opera 2016: Puccini and his World, with Pietro Mascagni’s Iris)

June 1, 2016

The Bard Music Festival, every year since 1990, offers music-lovers a splendid gift in its weekends of immersion in the music of some major composer and others related to him, the intellectual and artistic life of his time, and the legacy that connects us to it all. It equally presents us with a powerful challenge—a challenge to overcome our preconceptions about this partly familiar, partly unfamiliar music, chiefly the product of famous composers. In some cases we discover that a composer’s most popular music is not in fact his best, and our estimation of him rises significantly, as in the case of Sibelius and Prokofiev, or in others, like Schubert, we can become acquainted with genres like the part song, which have fallen out of the repertory because the social context for their performance has become obsolete. Many music-lovers divide Franz Liszt’s output between serious music of high quality and shallow, flashy display pieces. Again, the Bard Festival challenged its audiences to reconsider.

An explosion of music in the Berkshires: Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now and Arthur Greene, Pianist, at Simon’s Rock; Ensemble Nieuw Nederland at the Roe-Jan Library, Hillsdale, NY

This coming weekend there will be an explosion of music in the Berkshires! and I can strongly recommend three concerts taking place on Friday evening, Saturday afternoon, and Sunday afternoon. They are all free, but there is a suggested $10. donation for Saturday afternoon. Read on…






Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater

Shakespeare and Company Benefit: Hamish Linklater and Lily Rabe in Richard III.  October 10th at 2:00.  Be there!

Is Shakespeare loquacious? Reading the last pages of Richard III one might think so. King Richard speaks his way into oblivion.
He seems to be made of words—his actions secondary, the description being all. This, after all, is a character who succeeds in wooing a widow over the coffin of a close relative, and after the deed, tells us about it as if we didn’t get it the first time. His comeuppance arrives eventually, and true to form, he is ready with a virtuoso description of the situation. He is always and everywhere a soliloquist. Richard’s words are a virtuosity. Hamlet’s words are long-considered, pondered. Richard finds his demise at least as theatrical as his life, and when the end comes, Marlovian rant rules. Needless to say, this requires spectacular acting.






Richard Harrington, Form

FINITE INFINITY: a sculpture and light installation by Richard Harrington featuring sound performances by Forrest Larson, Phil Van Ouse

To begin with, the word infinity needn’t be capitalized as I’ve done here. Infinity is everywhere―which is the key to understanding what this show is about. In the 1980’s Douglas Hostaedtler in Goedel, Escher, Bach, devoted an entire chapter to why infinity ought not be capitalized, that may be why we decided to name the show finite infinity.







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